Dressed to Kill – Kiss Album #3

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Lead vocals Length
1. Room Service Paul Stanley Stanley 2:59
2. Two Timer Gene Simmons Simmons 2:47
3. Ladies in Waiting Simmons Simmons 2:35
4. Getaway Ace Frehley Peter Criss 2:43
5. Rock Bottom Stanley, Frehley Stanley 3:54
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Lead vocals Length
6. C’mon and Love Me Stanley Stanley 2:57
7. Anything for My Baby Stanley Stanley 2:35
8. She Simmons, Stephen Coronel Simmons, Stanley 4:08
9. Love Her All I Can Stanley Stanley 2:40
10. Rock and Roll All Nite Simmons, Stanley Simmons 2:49
Total length: 30:07

Dressed to Kill is the 1975 released by Casablanca Records, the third studio album of the US hard rock band Kiss.

Kiss went on tour after the release of Hotter Than Hell and had already for two “free” days on 24 and 25 January 1975 Anything for My Baby and Rock and Roll all Nite. recorded at the Larrabie Sound Studio in Los Angeles. At this time, the new album was still under the working title “Kiss at Midnight”.

The band interrupted the tour after the concert in Santa Monica (California) on 1 February 1975, to record the next album in the Electric Lady Studios in New York City. Due to the rapid episode of touring and recordings that the band had to complete (the group entered the studio only three months after the release of Hotter Than Hell), there was hardly time to write new songs.

For this reason, two titles were used, which still came from times of “Wicked Lester”, the band from which Kiss emerged, namely Love her all I can and She. The “Hotter Than Hell Tour” continued on February 20, 1975, and included three concerts (February 20, 21, and February 22, 1975), followed by the production of Dressed to Kill in New York until February 25 and completed. [1] In early March, the rehearsals for the Dressed to Kill tour began on March 19, 1975 in Northampton, Pennsylvania, began.

The album was produced by Casablanca Records boss Neil Bogart as a result of a business conflict with Kiss’s management: Bogart had started a relationship with Bill Aucoin’s management partner, Joyce Biawitz, and was briefed by her on a meeting called Aucoin Biawitz, the members of the group and the producers of the first two Kiss albums, Kenny Kerner and Richie Wise, had held to talk about an offer from the record label Atlantic Records, which wanted to take over the producer team, the management and Kiss ][1] Casablanca Records owed Kiss at this time, the payment of the contractually agreed shares of all previously sold Kiss records, and the management of the band was therefore forced to consider alternatives.

After dismissing Kerner and Wise, Bogart dismissed the tour operator’s expenses and forced Aucoin to pay for the expenses, which he did. The conflict was resolved by Aucoin Biawitz ‘share in the joint company Rock Steady for $ 50,000 and Bogart allowed to take over the production of the new album. This arrangement above all resolved Biawitz’s conflict of interest; at the same time Aucoin strengthened his position and Bogart realized his ideas regarding the needs of the music market.

Bogart argued that what the market now obviously needs are quick, happy albums that make people forget their worries. [6] This attitude resulted in Rock and Roll all Nite. The title was designed from the beginning as a hymn: Bogart tried to put as many soundtracks as possible on top of each other to make the song sound as if the chorus would be sung by a large crowd. When this failed, he got all the available people in the studio environment to him and let them sing and clap. Among other members of the kiss entourage, Peter Criss’ then-wife Lydia Criss and road manager JR Smalling will be heard on the recording.

The cover of Dressed to Kill was photographed by Bob Gruen. It shows the clothed but still masked members of the group on the street. The suits were borrowed from the photographer; Gene Simmons contributes to his much too small suit clogs, which belonged to the then wife of the photographer.

The cover photo was taken during a break to a photo series for the magazine Creem. Inspired by comic book templates, the group members are dressed in suits, noting that John Denver is giving a concert. To save the world, they move in a phone booth and cover the John Denver posters with the dates of their own concerts, so that the audience ultimately visit a Kiss concert.

The cover of Dressed to Kill was photographed by Bob Gruen. It shows the clothed but still masked members of the group on the street. The suits were borrowed from the photographer; Gene Simmons contributes to his much too small suit clogs, which belonged to the then wife of the photographer.

The cover photo was taken during a break to a photo series for the magazine Creem. Inspired by comic book templates, the group members are dressed in suits, noting that John Denver is giving a concert. To save the world, they move in a phone booth and cover the John Denver posters with the dates of their own concerts, so that the audience ultimately visit a Kiss concert.

The album was released on March 19, 1975. The two tracks C’mon and Love Me and Rock and Roll All Nite were singles released, but initially did not achieve high sales. Only the live album Alive !, which appeared in the autumn of the same year, gave the band the breakthrough, and in retrospect sold album and singles better. Dressed to Kill reached number 32 and thus the top 40 of the Billboard charts; in the charts of the magazine “Cashbox” it was enough for place 39.

In 1977, the album reached Gold status by the RIAA.